Imaginative Pencil Art Blog

Friday, March 23, 2007

Stay True to Your Own Unique Path and Style Regardless of What Other's Tell You


Three Drawings above from the Spiritual, Chess, and Mind Collections

Time and time again i have had a small majority of people tell me to not put so much in my art. I know they mean well and are talking in relation to what the "normal" person may see in my work at first glance. In fact, there was a book put together about my art explaining in detail what i am attempting to do and how it all works and makes sense. I also wanted that small majority who line up to tell me this recurring theme to have the chance to at least be able to read what my intentions are in my style without me rambling over and over on the phone about my theories and reasoning.

If we look at past artist's who strived and struggled to make a big difference in terms of their art surviving the test of time, a consistent trend seems to be these figures in art stayed the course with their approach, even in the face of critical adversity, whether friendly or worldly. Some examples that pop into my mind are Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel, where at the time, his approach was considered radical to a degree and the immense complexity of color and forms dancing around the ceiling made way for one of the most infuential works of art ever created.
I also recall the struggle Pisarro went through (and the impressionists), where his pointillist technique never caught any attention at first, even though he had children to feed and became poor for a while, he sacrificed because he believed in himself and his vision so much (some to this day still are in criticism of the way he handled that with children - i will share my opinion at a later time). His technique and paintings, after years of struggle and enduring poverty, finally became an overnight sensation and he was reawarded with financial freedom and security beyond his imagination.

The moral of this story, in my opinion, is that the norms of society will forever gravitate their opinions toward that center nucleus based on what they have perceived, in this case visually, through mass marketing channels and through their own sense of understanding. A majority of people (this may be changing now) share the same core ideas of what is considered normal and acceptable and these beliefs tend to shape our reaction to certain styles and approaches by various artists and in every industry. Easily recognizable objects will always take precedence over abstract forms by the majority due to the fact that our senses have been socially and biologically contructed over the course of evolution to gravitate towards these recognized forms and it pleases our senses much more easily. Abstract forms that are broken down into dynamic reflections of the underlying scientific properties challenges us much more and leaves us exhausted in our search for the truth and identification of the forms we want to recognize.


Abstract Drawing Compared to one of my Equine Portrait's

Both approaches have concrete messages in that the simple recognizable forms can evoke the emotion and get to the heart of the message instantly whereas the abstract muted forms can leave us open to interpretation and lead us into an unknown path for the truth which we can fnd in ourselves if we have the patience to stay course with the intended message and idea of the artist.

When someone tells me i should spend more time on portraits or i should put less in my work they are missing the overall grand scheme of my ideas and missing the point entirely perhaps through less time to actually study the works or because they subconsciously yearn for simplicity in a complex world. I choose to show the simple and complex dynamics of our world all rolled into one dynamic using foundations of color and shape to hopefully create harmonious and challenging images that appeal to all the senses at once. I also get much more satisfaction out of this challenge then i would drawing a portrait, although that has its challenges as well. I hope all artist's would stay true to their ideas and concepts regardless of what others say.

Justin ~~~

5 Comments:

  • I agree with this as well. A lot of times you will see lots of classes pertaining to simple object drawing or painting and relatively few about actual compositional structure. I think breaking the rules and having the courage to stay focused on that will seperate the great artist's from the hobby / craft artist's.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 2:54 PM  

  • What a nice find! I have never seen your work before but must say "wow"! Glad to see an artist who has a serious message and is committed as much as you are to your craft. keep up the good work and message.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 2:37 AM  

  • Hi, Justin!

    I've replied to your post about the art poetry contest. Thanks again!

    By Anonymous ~autolycus, at 1:02 PM  

  • I think your work is outstanding, I wouldn't change a thing - its working for you and you enjoy it. They are mesmerizing and you can get lost in them. Isnt that what its all about - the enjoyment the viewer see's

    By Anonymous Susie, at 4:07 PM  

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