Imaginative Pencil Art Blog

Tuesday, April 18, 2006

Redefining Reality: Looking at the World from an Artists Unique Perspective

Detail of EARTH GODDESS from artist Justin Michael Jenkins' abstract collection Written by artist Justin Michael Jenkins

When we look inside and around our everyday world we inhabit, we perceive our reality as exactly the way we intend to observe it; as identifiable objects that have certain colors and appearances which our senses have already adjusted to the condition of reality as we intended to relate to it. Therefore, we are somewhat limited to understanding what exactly it is that makes us a living organism capable of seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, tasting, and just plain existing. Understanding the dynamics and energy that create what we are and what we perceive as reality requires analyzation, dissection, and a "scientific" approach to reality and objectivity.

One of the unique ways we can strip away everyday reality as we perceive it is through a unique visualization of life. Approaching reality from "outside" the box enables one to look at the world much differently than perhaps someone who is overly engaged in the day to day happenings we equate with living. Much to often we see everyone running or racing around to get more accomplished yet never stop to take a deep breath and really absorb their situation or the situations around them. To this majority, life is a microcosmic world they have boxed themselves into in order to focus on their priorities. This leaves some of these individuals falling further behind in their perception of the big picture and wisdom of seeing all.

Visualizing the world from outside the box is a trait that is distinctively inborn in many artists and creative souls. Artists seem to have a much more liberated bent on the everyday happenings of a controlled, almost "robotic" systematic culture and system that cherishes time deadlines, routine habits, mass influened trends, and a need to somewhat compare one another based on the "norm" of everyday expectations. These cultural traits, although somehwat strong in their orderliness and which have some positive characteristics, seem to restrict one from understanding the complexities of life and the overall picture that invloves each and every one of us. This picture or portrait of our place in the universe with all its underlying complexity and science seems to be only image deep, without much emphasis on how it was painted or with what materials and why. The artist strives to understand how the picture was created, why it was created, when it was created, and how it was created, leaving his perception of the global picture as a multi-layered observation from the inward to the outward, as opposed to the natural instinct and cultural norm or perceiving things outwardly at first then slowly to the inward truth. This reversed excavation only strengthens our spirits and leaves us fulfilled knowing that we strive to understand, and on many occasions, understand what we are made up of or what we were painted with.

Redefining our bent on reality means going to the core of our existence and truly understanding our relationship with one another. An artist takes a human face or person in a worldy setting, then begins to create dynamic interplays of color and form fusing the setting with the human person as if he "observes" everything that is in the picture box, not just the person at face value. The end result is a picture that is unique to reality because the artist did not focus on one particular object but noticed and observed all the objects. This gives the artist a much broader interpretation of the total environment he was observing and painting. His brush strokes or pencil strokes become unified and woven fusions of observational studies that collide with each other creating a harmonious display of color, form, and the interlocking "marriage" of both these major elements so important to the reality we perceive from the human eye. This exploratory result then propels our reality to another level of consideration that demands the respect of every part of our known world or planet, emphasizing that the macrocosmic machine known as earth is an end result of the relationship and interplays of the microcosmic human beings, animals, and countless variety of planets and organisms that inherit this earth.

About the Author

Justin Michael Jenkins is a full time artist, designer, writer, webmaster, and his hobbies include studying the game of chess, collecting civil war memorabilia, and his ongoing goal of creating a huge home library which will house many interesting books on many topics. Imaginative Pencil and this blog features him prominently.

To contact the artist call 1-304-376-0762 or email him at jjenkins@imaginativepencil.com or visit our website at Imaginative Pencil